NYC Local News

Catskills Local News

Monsey Local News

Photos

Photos



YWN Coffee Room » Decaffeinated Coffee

Good Yeshivas in Baltimore

(44 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by Ariellah
  • Latest reply from jewishfeminist02

Tags:

No tags yet.

  1. Ariellah
    troll

    Does anyone know about any good yeshiva's in Baltimore? I want to send my son to a yeshiva in baltimore, his more modorn, i hear that ner yisroel is more modorn and that Beis Medrash and Mesivta of Baltimore is more yeshivish, like the boys there all keep shomer einyaim and always have to wear black hats and jackets. But, my son keeps shomer einyaim and he sometimes wears a different color jacket and ususally only wears black hats on Shabbos and not during the week. He has a bunch of friends in Baltimore and that's why he is interested in going there. We live in Lakewood.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. Ariellah
    troll

    Does anyone know anything about Beis Medresh and Mesivta of Baltimore or Ner Yisroel?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  3. playtime
    Likes to take himself aback

    Ner Yisroel is a very good place.
    How old is your son?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  4. Vogue
    school is soooooo passé

    Talmudic academy it's a chofetz chain type

    Posted 1 year ago #
  5. Yserbius123
    Member

    What is shomer enayim? I would hardly call Ner Yisroel "modern", I think "less Yeshivish" is a better term. Both NIRC and Schlangers (Beis Medrash and Mesivta of Baltimore) are very good Yeshivas but they are also very different type of places and what is good for the goose may not also be good for the gander.

    Both Yeshivas require hats during davening, on Shabbos and during the week. Schlangers requires only white shirts. But if you're picking a Yeshiva for your son based on what the dress code is, may I suggest, well, not doing that?

    NIRC is a big place. First year beis medrash has something like forty bachurim and two rebbeim. And the numbers are similar for all the other years up until sixth where everyone starts getting married and moving to kollel. First thing you should know is that there are several different Ner Yisroels in the same building. There are the guys who came straight from the Mechina (high school) and generally stay for a year or two before going to Eretz Yisroel and then a different American Yeshiva. There are the Persians and Latinos who often come with no Yeshiva experience and group together in some of the "easier" shiurim for the first few years. There are the guys who come when they are 21 just because they want a Yeshiva that allows college and they don't want to go to Touro or YU. And so on.

    Schlangers is a lot smaller. I believe that there are only about 80 to a hundred bachurim there. The bachurim are a lot more integrated and close with each other. Most of them were there for Mesivta (high school. Seriously, can Yeshivas just decide on one word to use for high school and stick with it?) and decided to stay on. It's much more Yeshivish in the sense that there is an enforced dress code and no college allowed.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  6. Ariellah
    troll

    shomer enayim is that boys aren't aloud to look at girls... my son is going to be in 9th grade. Is it not a good idea for me to send him to Ner? I really want him to keep sdhomer enayim and to start wearing only black jackets and black hats... Is it better for him to go to Slangers?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. Yserbius123
    Member

    I don't know enough about your son to make that decision for you. Like I said, they are both very good Yeshivas. It would be a good idea to send him to either Yeshiva.

    I'm not sure what the whole deal is with Shomer Enayim as this is the first I'm hearing of it, but it sounds like something that is a personal decision that could change over time (he is after all only 13). Both Yeshivas are good places if you want him to keep to that decision. But then again, in both places there are guys who would do the opposite. It's his choice who he hangs out with.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  8. Ariellah
    troll

    In Bais Medresh and Mesivta of Batimore i heard it's very strict with everything. So, it could be good for him. But, then, if he really hates it, even though i heard a lot of good things about the rebeim and boys there and heard that usually the people who leave are the ones who are more modorn, it could be that instead he'll become even more modorn. So, i don't know if he should go to Ner yisroel or Bais Medresh and Mesivta of Baltimore because in Ner Yisroel there are boys there that are more modorn and more yeshivish and it could be that he'll become friends with the more modorn ones which means that maybe he'll become more modorn because of them.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  9. playtime
    Likes to take himself aback

    "He has a bunch of friends in Baltimore and that's why he is interested in going there"

    Which yeshiva are they in?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  10. Brony
    Member

    wut is shomer eynaim? i guess the phrase "im shomer" has a different meaning now than it did when i was a kid...

    Posted 1 year ago #
  11. Toi
    beware the cleats

    im a shomer sachar.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. periwinkle
    Member

    Yeshiva Bais Medrash and Mesivta in Baltimore is commonly known as Reb Slanger's yeshiva. You do not choose between Ner Yisroel and Reb Slanger's yeshiva. Reb Slanger chooses your son, or not. Going to this yeshiva is highly selective. The Rosh Yeshiva asks the eighth grade rebbeim of both boys schools, TA and TI, who are the "best" boys in the class, in both learning and in frumkeit and behavior. The best boys in the eighth grades are then invited to spend a shabbos at Reb Slanger's yeshiva, where they are observed in learning, frumkeit, behavior (i.e., maturity). If they pass the shabbos test, they are then invited to join the yeshiva for ninth grade. Yes, this is the most frum yeshiva in Baltimore, the most prestigious, the most selective. Your son can choose to go to TA's high school, which I've heard has excellent rebbeim and dorm facilities. TA (Chofetz Chaim) is trying to improve its high school and make it more like a yeshiva.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  13. Health
    Member

    periwinkle -"Yeshiva Bais Medrash and Mesivta in Baltimore is commonly known as Reb Slanger's yeshiva. You do not choose between Ner Yisroel and Reb Slanger's yeshiva."

    And why not? You sound like a relative of his. He was running the Mechina (as Mashchiach) for many years so I highly doubt it changed that much since he left.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  14. akuperma
    Member

    Ner is huge. Schlangers is smaller. In some ways, one can regard Schlangers as being a friendly spin-off from Ner. There isn't a radical difference in ideology, though Schlangers is a bit more focused on trying to be "yeshivish", but both are basically yeshivish . Remember that Ner has a gigantic campus and a much larger and more diverse population, whereas Schlangers is in a nice residential area and is primarily high school age. Other yeshivos in the Baltimore-Washington area are less yeshivish (more modern).

    Posted 1 year ago #
  15. jbaldy22
    Member

    I wouldnt say that ner and and rav schlangers are that similar. Schlangers specifically wants to stay small and seems to have a lot more hadracha. Ner is really big and wants to get bigger. Its not as warm of an environment and kids can become just another number there. I would also say that the student body of rav schlangers is a lot more yeshivish than ner. Secular studies program is a drop better at ner as the one in rav schlangers is basically non-existent but at least they are accredited - when the yeshiva started you had to get a GED.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  16. The Goq™
    Founder, President, Vice President and CEO of the CR Welcome Wagon!

    Akuperma i don't feel it is appropriate for you to refer to it as Schlangers it is a yeshiva not a butcher shop.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  17. periwinkle
    Member

    Reply to Health, who said I sounded like a relative of the Rosh Yeshiva. (You wrote "like a relative of his". FYI, one does not refer to a Rosh Yeshiva with a pronoun - he, his. It is "the Rosh Yeshiva." This is true for all Roshei Yeshiva. It is a matter of respect.)

    I had information about the yeshiva that I hope was helpful to the person inquiring. Important to mention - I have not heard that this yeshiva is open to out of towners. But I'm not certain.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  18. Utah
    Member

    Schalngers has a dorm...

    Posted 1 year ago #
  19. yeshivaguy45
    Member

    From what I knew 5 years ago, it had a dorm and was open to out of towners but the dowm was full and someone I knew wasn't able to stay in the dowm and had to stay with relatives in Baltimore instead. This was 5 years ago, anything could have happened since then. From what I knew 5 years ago, it was a yeshivish place and there was a lot of very yeshivish guys who were there, but they really were targeting yeshivish guys but not ultra yeshivish.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  20. jbaldy22
    Member

    Rav Schlangers yeshiva has a dorm and has out of towners

    Posted 1 year ago #
  21. Ender
    Member

    Ariellah: Another difference between the two yeshiva's is their emphasis in secular studies. Based on your posts, my impression is that it isn't a major priority for you.

    Goq: I'd hate to burst your bubble, but everyone calls it Schlangers, even the bachurim that learn there.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  22. Health
    Member

    periwinkle -"(You wrote "like a relative of his". FYI, one does not refer to a Rosh Yeshiva with a pronoun - he, his. It is "the Rosh Yeshiva." This is true for all Roshei Yeshiva. It is a matter of respect.)"

    Speaking in third person to a Rosh Hayeshiva is respectful. Definitely don't have to do it refering to him on a blog. And even directly if one doesn't do it -it's Not Chutzpa. This is in the Geder of L'fney Meshuras Hadin. What tends to happen in our generation (and I see this all the time) is when we confuse Chumras with Dinim -we equate the two and sometimes become lax in the actual Dinim.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  23. JustHavingFun
    Real Cool!

    @Ariella - re: black jackets and hats
    Your son will soon conform to the conditions that his friends keep. My sons went to a modern yeshiva but one of their classmates wore black hat and black jacket... and he was well-liked and held in high esteem by the other bochrim.

    Don't choose the yeshiva by the dress code is a good idea. Choose it by the middos you see the bochrim embodying and the menahelim embracing. Watched the news lately? There are too many yidden hiding under their black uniforms who have hearts of black and many good yidden wearing all manner of dress who have hearts of gold. Go for the gold.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  24. periwinkle
    Member

    And that, Health, is the problem with blogs. The casual informality, the use of first names when you don't know someone at all, no rules, not knowing what is the proper behavior and what is a chumrah. On a blog, everything goes! Including respect. The son/daughter of a Rosh Yeshiva, in speech, refers to his/her father as the Rosh Yeshiva. I learned respect from that son/daughter. Do you applaud the rav after the shiur? Or do you stand silently? I guess bloggers would applaud if they approved the shiur and boo if they found it wanting.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  25. The Goq™
    Founder, President, Vice President and CEO of the CR Welcome Wagon!

    Ender the fact that everyone does it does not make it correct it is a complete lack of derech eretz either call the yeshiva by its name or call it Rav Schlangers yeshiva.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  26. Health
    Member

    periwinkle -"And that, Health, is the problem with blogs. The casual informality, the use of first names when you don't know someone at all, no rules, not knowing what is the proper behavior and what is a chumrah. On a blog, everything goes! Including respect."

    You missed my point. My point was there is no Inyan to talk in third person regarding Rosh Hayeshivos in any other venue than directly towards him. And even this is a Chumra, not Halacha.
    So instead of grasping my point -you belittled blogs. Whether it's a blog, newspaper, magazine or whatever, there is no reason to use the third person. Taking a respectful Chumra and applying wherever you feel like and then putting down those who see no reason to apply the Chumra everywhere is why some people should stay away from Chumras. It leads to Gaiva and Sinas Chinum.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  27. jewishfeminist02
    jewishfeminist01 + jewishfeminist02

    Schlangers, TA, and Ner Yisroel are all excellent choices. You really can't go wrong. I know boys who have come out of all three of them and they have good learning and good middos.

    As far as how modern they each are, well, all are pretty yeshivish. I would actually say that based on the boys I know who graduated from each one, the most modern is Schlangers. I don't think Schlangers is really as elite as periwinkle says. If your son is seriously interested, and if he has a strong learning background, he will be fine.

    Ner Yisroel is really the default in Baltimore, though, except for people whose sons started at TA for elementary and middle school and decide to just keep them there, or those who have a particular interest in Schlangers.

    Before everyone jumps on me for commenting on this thread, I grew up in Baltimore and I know these things based on my brother's friends and my friends' husbands and brothers.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  28. Health
    Member

    JF02 -"Before everyone jumps on me for commenting on this thread, I grew up in Baltimore"

    Now I know why you're vegan. Kosher Byte and Royale don't have the best meals around - so you went Vegan. You don't remember the old Liebes, just like the East Side delis.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  29. Ender
    Member

    JFem: I would like to hear your definitions of "yeshivish" and "Modern"

    Goq: I'm confused. Who is being disrespected?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  30. jbaldy22
    Member

    @jewishfeminist02
    the dynamic of rav schlangers yeshiva has changed over the years. It is significantly more yeshivish than when any of your husbands friends went there. The yeshiva has become a lot more in demand than it used to be.

    TA has gone through a couple of interesting phases and I feel are still trying to shed the "community school" identity. It has moved significantly to the right but is still the least yeshivish out of the three. It definitely has great and extremely warm rabbeim though.

    @Health I have yet to find a chinese place in the area that compares to David Chu.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  31. takahmamash
    Member

    I have yet to find a chinese place in the area that compares to David Chu.

    I used to think that too, until I went to Pagoda in Tiveria. (I lived many years in Baltimore before making aliyah.)

    Posted 1 year ago #
  32. The Goq™
    Founder, President, Vice President and CEO of the CR Welcome Wagon!

    Ender if you saw Rav Schlanger on the street would you say good morning Schlanger!! or would you say good morning Rav Schlanger it is not appropriate to call the yeshiva Schlangers i dont doubt that most people do but it is still wrong. To answer your question it is the Rosh Hayeshiva who is being disrespected.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  33. Ender
    Member

    Goq: I totally agree with you that referring to R' Schlanger as "schlanger would be horribly disrespectful. It is my belief, however, that institutions often develop names of their own. In this case the yeshiva has developed the name Schlangers. When people say Schlangers they mean to say the yeshiva known as Schlangers, Not R' Schlangers yeshiva.

    On a side note. does it bother you that many tannaim, amoraim, rishonim, etc. are referred to by their first names?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  34. Ender
    Member

    takahmamash, Health: Yumami has very good Asian food. Its a little bit more expensive but it doesn't have those sickly sweet sauces on everything that Davis Schu's has.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  35. akuperma
    Member

    "Schlanger's" is the common names for the yeshiva of Rav Schlanger (it has an official name that no one uses). Similarly, "Chaim Berlin" is the "street" name for the yeshiva of Rav Chaim Berlin. "Schlanger's" (the yeshiva) was founded by Rav Schlanger (the person). Even if at sometime in the distant future there is connection between the yeshiva and the family of its founder, the name will stick.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  36. The Goq™
    Founder, President, Vice President and CEO of the CR Welcome Wagon!

    Just because something is done by a majority of people does not make it right, it smacks of disrespect and a casualness that is not appropriate.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  37. Toi
    beware the cleats

    goq- you also wouldnt call R m solomon by "R mattisyahu" if you met him. im not disagreeing with your point, just the proof you presented.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  38. fed ben fed
    Member

    I just saw this post today.

    As a graduate of Ner's high school (Israel Henry Beren High). I just wanted to mention that the school is very academic (for limudi Kodesh). While it is a great school for many; for the boys who aren't up to the challenge, it can be a real disaster. It’s not uncommon for a nice chunk of boys to leave (or be asked to leave) after one or two years.
    BH I was very happy there and didn’t mind the multiple weekly tests (Chumash,Bikeis, Eyin, etc…).
    On an interesting note; the Ner ninth grade will probably have a wider range of backgrounds and will be more geographically diverse then TA or R’Schlangers. Personally I enjoyed meeting and forming friendships that span the multiple Jewish communities.

    I think a visit for a Shabbos would really help with your decision.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  39. jewishfeminist02
    jewishfeminist01 + jewishfeminist02

    Health, I am vegetarian, not vegan. Baltimore has many good quality kosher restaurants. They did not affect my decision to become vegetarian.

    jbaldy, my husband's friends did not go to Schlangers. My husband is not from Baltimore. My friend's husband, on the other hand, went to Schlangers probably about five years ago. Has it really changed so dramatically in five years?

    Also, Umami (not Yumami) has a nicer atmosphere, better menu, really good cocktails, and all around better food than David Chu's (not David Schu's). I like David Chu's, too, but Umami is definitely superior and well worth the higher prices.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  40. jbaldy22
    Member

    @jewishfeminist02
    sorry for the reading fail. and it actually has evolved quite a bit in the past five years through a combination of factors including new rebbeim and the hanhala having the ability to be more selective of who they take (because of the increase in applications).

    Posted 1 year ago #
  41. Josh31
    Member

    Ner wants a diverse geographical crowd. Having a zip code that begins with two one hurts the application, having a zip code beginning with seven five is supposed to help.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  42. mitzpeh
    Member

    Just to add a few facts and figures....Bais HaMedrash & Mesivta of Baltimore has a dormitory, with a student body made up of roughly 1/2 Baltimore residents and 1/2 out-of-towners. The Yeshiva hosts an "open house" for 3 or 4 Shabbosim in the winter. The talmidim are serious learners with a strong sense of yiras Shomayim. By the time the boys are in the upper grades they have, by and large, become star learners.

    Since the Yeshiva's establishment in 1997, the High School curriculum has been approved by the State of Maryland. The Yeshiva's Bais Medrash program is now accredited by AARTS and is able to grant students a Bachelor's Degree in Talmudic Law.

    The Rosh HaYeshiva HaRav Slanger hails from pre-war Europe and is a Holocaust survivor, was a talmid of Horav Shach, Horav Lopian, the Steipler Gaon and many other Gedolim. The Yeshiva is very unique from others as HaRav Slanger is the vibrant bridge connecting past and future for his talmidim.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  43. takahmamash
    Member

    Also, Umami (not Yumami) has a nicer atmosphere, better menu, really good cocktails, and all around better food than David Chu's (not David Schu's). I like David Chu's, too, but Umami is definitely superior and well worth the higher prices.

    Debatable, and I disagree. Umami is better on a few things, but overall, David Chu's is the better choice, IMHO.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  44. jewishfeminist02
    jewishfeminist01 + jewishfeminist02

    Quality of food is debatable; that's a matter of personal taste. But Umami does have a more upscale atmosphere, more unique menu (Chinese/Japanese "fusion"-- ever had their pad thai? it's AMAZING), and, notably, a great selection of healthy and gluten-free options, which are difficult to find in restaurants in general and nearly impossible to find in Chinese restaurants. There is an entire section of the menu called "Revolution Diet". Those dishes are brought to you in pretty bamboo steamer baskets. And I really don't know of many kosher restaurants that make their own cocktails.

    I'm not knocking David Chu's. I really like David Chu's. It has good service, reasonable prices, and good food. But I prefer Umami for a lot of reasons, many of which are based on objective facts, not opinions.

    Posted 1 year ago #

RSS feed for this topic

Reply

You must log in to post.